Author Topic: Ever seen a 'Lincoln log' bridge? I hadn't either.  (Read 965 times)

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chessie system fan

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Ever seen a 'Lincoln log' bridge? I hadn't either.
« on: January 23, 2014, 08:16:30 PM »
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This is the only picture I've seen of something like this.  It must have been pretty impressive in person!

http://www.historypin.com/attach/project/42-railroads/map/index/#!/geo:45.890456,-122.822685/zoom:20/dialog:187234/tab:details/
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davefoxx

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Re: Ever seen a 'Lincoln log' bridge? I hadn't either.
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2014, 08:46:45 PM »
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M.C. Fujiwara posted this picture some time ago.  Interesting to say the least.

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nkalanaga

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Re: Ever seen a 'Lincoln log' bridge? I hadn't either.
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2014, 12:43:17 AM »
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Very common in some logging areas.  It was cheaper to use the entire log than to haul it to the mill, saw it, haul it back, and find a crew who could put the pieces together.  Basically, they're oversized log retaining walls without the fill.
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PEIR

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Re: Ever seen a 'Lincoln log' bridge? I hadn't either.
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2014, 07:33:30 PM »
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With the size of some of those logs it must of been quite a bit of manual labor to get them into position and secured in those days. Those old timers would be amazed if they saw today's equipment at work.
Working on a early 90's ALCO powered short line.

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chessie system fan

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Re: Ever seen a 'Lincoln log' bridge? I hadn't either.
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2014, 09:00:29 PM »
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Interesting.  This must have been a Pacific Northwest practice.  I've seen a great number of Southeast logging pictures and there's nothing like this.

I did more searching and found a few more pictures.

http://trasyy.livejournal.com/1239412.html
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nkalanaga

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Re: Ever seen a 'Lincoln log' bridge? I hadn't either.
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2014, 12:31:06 AM »
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Even in the early days of railroad logging they had steam shovels and pile drivers, as well as all kinds of skidders and yarders.  You'd be surprised how fast one of these bridges could be built.  After all, if they can get the logs onto the cars, they can get them into a hole.  By the 1920s, when these pictures were apparently taken, they had quite good machinery.

Notice the Northern Pacific log car?  Not all of the Northwest loggers had their own cars.

Here's another picture from the same line, with an even odder bridge.  One post under the under the middle with some angled braces to keep it from falling over?  Or did they have to splice the middle of three or more logs?

Title                 Log train, Apex Timber Company, ca. 1925
Photographer   Kinsey, Clark
Date      1925~
Notes      Caption on image: Apex Timber Co. C. Kinsey Photo, Seattle. 24

PH Coll 516.27
Contextual Notes   
Apex Timber Company was headquartered in Pe Ell, Lewis County ca. 1923-1926. It may also have had operations in Ceres, a small settlement in the Chehalis River Valley 11 miles west of Chehalis in west central Lewis County. The name was chosen by W. C. Albee, superintendent of South Bend branch of Northern Pacific Railway when the branch was built. Ceres in Roman mythology, is the goddess of agriculture. Evidently, Albee was quite impressed with the valley's fertile soil.

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/clarkkinsey&CISOPTR=30

And a link to the entire collection:
http://content.lib.washington.edu/clarkkinseyweb/index.html
« Last Edit: January 25, 2014, 12:32:38 AM by nkalanaga »
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