Author Topic: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug  (Read 1220 times)

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pnolan48

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Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« on: September 12, 2013, 02:11:55 PM »
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I showed this in Milwaukee, but was in such a rush for that show that I never took pictures. The PRR had four of these 142-footers, mostly used for Chesapeake Bay crossing from post-WWII into the 1980s. This is the same tug used by the ATSF in San Francisco, although the PRR car barges were larger. I've read that the PRR used a special color for the ships, a bit redder than that on trains. There are minor detail differences between the PRR and ATSF versions, with the PRR version retaining the lower bow rub strake, the anchor locations, a second ventilator and a lifeboat







Price is $675 plus shipping for a built-up, and $225 plus shipping for a kit. I just got the instructions up on my web site.

peteski

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2013, 03:46:01 PM »
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Your work never ceases to amaze me Pete! 
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pjm20

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2013, 06:05:36 PM »
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I wish I needed to get one, but I don't think these chugged up the Susquehanna to Harrisburg.  :D Nonetheless this is an awesome model!
Modeling the PRR in N Scale
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robert3985

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2013, 07:12:35 PM »
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Sheesh!!  Hats off to you Pete, that is one gorgeous tug!

pnolan48

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2013, 07:38:45 PM »
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Thanks!

Anyone notice that a spider added to the rigging? The ship has been sitting in a fairly tight box since late July, but a spider got in and added some very delicate rigging. Wish I could train him to do the whole thing! I did Photoshop some of it out, as it wasn't apparent to my eye.

peteski

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2013, 09:29:38 PM »
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Thanks!

Anyone notice that a spider added to the rigging? The ship has been sitting in a fairly tight box since late July, but a spider got in and added some very delicate rigging. Wish I could train him to do the whole thing! I did Photoshop some of it out, as it wasn't apparent to my eye.

No, I didn't notice it until you mentioned it. I agree that a trained spider would be a great small-scale modeling tool.  :D
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pnolan48

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2013, 04:50:39 PM »
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It really shouldn't surprise me, but those spider lines are strong and attached very securely. Those spiders know their knots!

I use very fine black nylon thread for rigging (15/2, or about .003"), and the spider lines are dwarfed by it. I find this size thread is just about right for visibility; it is a scale 1/2 inch in diameter, too big for some lines and too small for others, so just right for general purpose use. Like some of the smaller scale ship modelers (the 1/700 and 1/1200 folks) I have unraveled single strands from it, which is an exercise that will drive you blind and utterly insane simultaneously.

peteski

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2013, 05:33:05 PM »
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I have unraveled single strands from it, which is an exercise that will drive you blind and utterly insane simultaneously.

And I thought that it was something else that drove you blind (and possibly insane?)   :oops:
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pnolan48

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2013, 10:47:06 AM »
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I guess EZ-Line is also .003". As it is stretchy, it probably goes thinner when installed. I have a spool of it somewhere. When it first came out, I used the next size up for architectural models, and it wowed architects who had never seen it.

robert3985

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2013, 09:46:27 PM »
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I guess EZ-Line is also .003". As it is stretchy, it probably goes thinner when installed. I have a spool of it somewhere. When it first came out, I used the next size up for architectural models, and it wowed architects who had never seen it.

According to the Berkshire Junction's website, EZ Line comes in two diameters, Fine (.010" dia.) and Heavy (.020" dia.)

Unless there's a new product they've introduced and have yet to change their website, .003" dia. flexible line doesn't exist yet.

pnolan48

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Re: Pictures of the PRR's Large Tug
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2013, 06:51:10 PM »
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See my replies on other threads about .003 line. I think we went off-kilter with the "1/2-inch" dimension on that thread, which is roughly .003.