Author Topic: Glueing your cabs in place  (Read 1505 times)

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6axlepwr

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Glueing your cabs in place
« on: July 29, 2013, 02:09:54 PM »
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I was curious.

Is there any real reason why you would need to remove the cab once you finish a model? Is there anything in there that needs maintenance or replacing?

I do not like how sometimes after finishing a model and putting it all together the cab will not completely sit snug against the battery boxes. Does not happen all the time, but on occasion it does. So I thought I would ask if anyone really had a reason NOT to glue the cab in place?
Brian

Philip H

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2013, 02:12:27 PM »
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I glued on the Shapeways cab I bought fo rmy BQ23-7 project.  I made that choice because there was no other way to affix it - no mounting tabs, and it covered where the old short hood sat.  Frankly, on N scale equipment the only reason I can see for separate cabs is to make the molding easier.
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davefoxx

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2013, 02:14:05 PM »
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I just bought one of those BQ23-7 cabs from Shapeways, and, once I've dunked it in Bestine, I plan to glue it on.  If you think that the cab on a factory Atlas model can move, there is nothing to hold this cab in place.

As for Atlas factory models, I've noticed that GP9/7s seem to have this problem.  I haven't had to glue one on yet, because I bend the handrails near the cab to remove some of the stress.  Unfortunately, those models don't seem to have the handrail holes in the cab in the right place, because the handrails bow down when the cab is sitting properly.  Drives me nuts.  I will glue the next one that gives me trouble.

DFF

P.S. Heh, looks like Philip responded almost simultaneously.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 02:16:05 PM by davefoxx »

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sizemore

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2013, 02:28:16 PM »
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Instead of gluing, I usually add a block to the bottom interior of problematic cabs and use a counter sunk screw to hold it to the sill. That way I can still dissassemble everything at a later date. Also prevents blow outs which could destroy both the manufacturer supplied handrails or my own brass gimmicks I'm working on.

The S.

6axlepwr

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2013, 02:37:59 PM »
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OK The S. You have to explain these blow outs?

You having problems with the glazing blowing out when your decoder explodes or something  :D. Just curious.

I to have an issue with the Atlas GP7/9 handrails. What a design mess up that was. One of the advantages of doing your own paint is you can fix these problems. I just wish Atlas would go back and revise these models that have the walkway/handrail setup and make them solid sill units and separate handrails like they did on their GP38/40. It always seems to me that on the Atlas GP7/9 the sill units droop at the ends.
Brian

sizemore

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2013, 03:07:09 PM »
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OK The S. You have to explain these blow outs?

You having problems with the glazing blowing out when your decoder explodes or something  :D. Just curious.

I to have an issue with the Atlas GP7/9 handrails. What a design mess up that was. One of the advantages of doing your own paint is you can fix these problems. I just wish Atlas would go back and revise these models that have the walkway/handrail setup and make them solid sill units and separate handrails like they did on their GP38/40. It always seems to me that on the Atlas GP7/9 the sill units droop at the ends.

Typically when taking apart for maintenance I've had and seen a loco or two where the sill stays put but the hood and cab decide to breakfree. Typically the pressure fit handrails like to stay with the sill, and blamo the handrails break away at the T of the first stanchion fore & aft of the cab. Since then I take off the shells using the "sudden stop-short drop" method using the lid of the box under pilot steps. I believe Bearden "patented it" may have been someone else.  It also affords not getting skin oils on the paintjob either.

I also hand file the locking nubs on the chassis to make it easier to remove the shell.

The S.

wcfn100

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2013, 04:00:29 PM »
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As for Atlas factory models, I've noticed that GP9/7s seem to have this problem.  I haven't had to glue one on yet, because I bend the handrails near the cab to remove some of the stress.  Unfortunately, those models don't seem to have the handrail holes in the cab in the right place, because the handrails bow down when the cab is sitting properly.  Drives me nuts.  I will glue the next one that gives me trouble.


The GP30's have an issue with the handrails too.  From what I can guess, the color matched handrails shrink more than the black ones out of the mold which results in a bowing apart of the handrail and sill when put together.  Atlas (or the factory) has even had to resort to using tape to keep the two from separating.

Jason

u18b

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2013, 04:44:00 PM »
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Might regret if you need to change handrails- depending on the loco.

Ron Bearden
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Catt

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2013, 10:54:23 PM »
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On my CQ30-7 I glued square styrene to the tops of the battery boxes to give the cab a friction fit.I p[lan to dothe same with my BQ23-7 when I get to that point.This something I have done to HO locos to that have poor fitting cabs.
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3rdboxcar

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2013, 04:17:49 AM »
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I just bought one of those BQ23-7 cabs from Shapeways, and, once I've dunked it in Bestine, I plan to glue it on.  If you think that the cab on a factory Atlas model can move, there is nothing to hold this cab in place.


When I designed the BQ23-7 cab I deliberately did not put in any tabs etc to hold the cab in place as FUD is quite brittle and I felt they could have easily been broken off.

Alexander

Ike the BN Freak

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2013, 04:44:11 AM »
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I haven't had the need to...yet.  However if I did, I'd just glue the cab to the hood which in theory should bring them tight.

sirenwerks

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2013, 08:55:25 AM »
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It also affords not getting skin oils on the paintjob either.

Tim, you may want to invest in some cotton gloves, the type used by museums for handling artwork.  The sure grip variety  that have the textured finger and palm face make it easier to work with small objects, just make sure the fingers fit. =1145]http://www.universityproducts.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=1145&primary=1&parentId=&navTree[]=1145 Or, at the very least, talc-less disposables.  Nitrile surgical gloves are the best and usually use cornstarch instead of talc.  The talc in cheap gloves is usually blown on pretty sloppily, and onto the outside of the gloves, and gets onto your models.  Corn starch tends to get absorbed by the skin quickly and surgical gloves are guaranteed not to have residue on the outside of the glove to keep them sterile.  Just some of the little facts I learned working in museums.
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sizemore

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2013, 10:43:02 AM »
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The S, you may want to invest in some cotton gloves, the type used by museums for handling artwork.  The sure grip variety  that have the textured finger and palm face make it easier to work with small objects, just make sure the fingers fit. =1145]http://www.universityproducts.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=1145&primary=1&parentId=&navTree[]=1145 Or, at the very least, talc-less disposables.  Nitrile surgical gloves are the best and usually use cornstarch instead of talc.  The talc in cheap gloves is usually blown on pretty sloppily, and onto the outside of the gloves, and gets onto your models.  Corn starch tends to get absorbed by the skin quickly and surgical gloves are guaranteed not to have residue on the outside of the glove to keep them sterile.  Just some of the little facts I learned working in museums.

I thought about that, tried it. The same problem exists though if I scratch my face or run my hands through my hair with the gloves on. Combine that with over time grabbing the dynamic brake blister to remove the shell "polishes" the paint. When painting though the nitrile gloves come in pretty handy as holding the piece makes it more maneuverable versus holding it in a tool and contorting my body to get the right angle with an airbrush.

The S.



sirenwerks

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2013, 11:37:38 AM »
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Working on models is like working food service; touch yourself - wash your hands - gloves or not.  The sure grip cotton gloves would solve the polish issue as they don't slip like the standard cotton glove.
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Nato

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Re: Glueing your cabs in place
« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2013, 12:59:10 PM »
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 :|          "Tacky Glue", it will hold the cab in place,yet is easly broken free if removal is needed. Nate Goodman (Nato).