Author Topic: Weathering Powders  (Read 1494 times)

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kelleywpns

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Weathering Powders
« on: April 27, 2013, 03:40:24 PM »
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My plan is to start weathering my fleet of rolling stock over a period of a couple of months.  I've only used an airbrush in the past.  Is there any pros or cons to the few brands of weathering powders out there?  Bragdon vs AIM?  Has anyone tried the Doc OBrien brand sold by Micro-Mark?

Any info would be helpful.  Thanks

Mike
Modeling the New Haven and Boston & Maine

jimmo

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Re: Weathering Powders
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2013, 05:42:49 PM »
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You don't have to limit yourself to model railroad products when it comes to things like weathering powders. I purchased a set of earth tone chalks at an art supply store and I use an Exacto knife to scrape them into 7-day plastic medicine boxes. The beauty of the medicine box is the compartments seal very well so your powder doesn't spill while stored. I use a a stiff 1/4" oil painting brush trimmed at an angle so I can get the powder into smaller spaces and corners. Dullcote fixes it in place but will require additional applications of chalk as it seems to wash it away at first. Just realize that it needs to be built up gradually.
James R. Will

Mike C

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Re: Weathering Powders
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2013, 08:55:04 PM »
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  I used pastel chalks as jimmo did. They worked OK for me, but I found that spraying them with Dullcoat kinda washes them out. I have been using the Bragdon powders lately and really like them. Just as easy as the chalk....( well probably easier, come already ground up ) , But there is no need to spray with Dullcoat. They have some kind of glue binder mixed in, so when applied properly they stick without without the spray.  I've also heard of some people using womens eye shadow, Havn't tried that one yet...LOL......Mike

johnhale

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Re: Weathering Powders
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2013, 10:21:26 PM »
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I have used both Bragdon and AIM, both are really good. Both have an adhesive in the powder that makes them adhere with pressure. Both are ground very fine.

I have this set from AIM (http://www.aimprodx.com/display.php?product=3100) and will tell you the gray and white are used as much as the other colors. Get a set and play with them to get the look you want.

Now with that said, I also use india ink washes, grout and concrete washes, and lots of Techniques from Tom's book.

John
John Hale
1960's era New Haven Railroad
http://mymodelrailroadsite.com

mmagliaro

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Re: Weathering Powders
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2013, 02:33:40 AM »
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I've used the Doc Obrien's from Micro-Mark for years.  I like them.  Certain colors, like the grays and white,
really dig in and work well, as do most of the rust red, and brown shades.  The black is one I could never get
to stick well, even when grinding them in with a brush.

Most of the steam loco weathering I've been doing for that past few years has been with those powders.
Since the light colors adhere well, they work well on slippery plastic truck sideframes.

flight2000

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Re: Weathering Powders
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2013, 02:44:34 AM »
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My plan is to start weathering my fleet of rolling stock over a period of a couple of months.  I've only used an airbrush in the past.  Is there any pros or cons to the few brands of weathering powders out there?  Bragdon vs AIM?  Has anyone tried the Doc OBrien brand sold by Micro-Mark?

Any info would be helpful.  Thanks

Mike

I've used the Doc O'Briens chalks for a looong time and like how they work and hold to a model.  I'm still using the first set I bought almost 10 years ago and I still haven't gotten halfway through the amount you get.  MM puts them on sale every once in awhile, so keep a look out for that. 

Agree with the others that their are non-railroad specific things out there that are normally cheaper to buy as well.  Michael's Craft Stores are a great place to wonder if you stuck going there with a significant other...  :facepalm:  Think I had that place memorized before we moved to GE. 

Brian
I've never met a covered hopper I didn't like.... :)

central.vermont

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Re: Weathering Powders
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2013, 06:43:01 AM »
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I've used the Doc Obrien's from Micro-Mark for years.  I like them.  Certain colors, like the grays and white,
really dig in and work well, as do most of the rust red, and brown shades.  The black is one I could never get
to stick well, even when grinding them in with a brush.

Most of the steam loco weathering I've been doing for that past few years has been with those powders.
Since the light colors adhere well, they work well on slippery plastic truck sideframes.

Max and others,

I love weathering with chalks but what I do first to get them to adhere to slippery plastics and glossy surfaces is to Dull coat everything first. The Dull coating will give the chalk something to bite onto and stay where you want it.

Jon

kelleywpns

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Re: Weathering Powders
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2013, 03:31:02 PM »
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Thanks for all the info.

For those that have used the Doc O'Brien's brand, do those powders have the self-adhesive properties like AIM and Bragdon?

Mike
Modeling the New Haven and Boston & Maine