Author Topic: What Era  (Read 3112 times)

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Alaska Railroader

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What Era
« on: January 17, 2013, 11:55:22 PM »
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I don't quite have a feel for the eras that the members here favor the most. Well, I think most cover the various generations of diesel with steam as a side interest. Am I right? I have some favorite kits of ours in Z scale that I would like to bring up to N scale but the choice might lie in what the majority wants to see. No no no, please don't send me a bunch of wish lists, I would die trying to fill the orders! I cannot possibly do custom jobs and still produce for the general market. So, I'll try to bring in some structures that I have already completed or currently have on the drawing board.

The kits run the gamut from Colorado silver mining to mid 20th century on up to present day. Where are the "holes" in N scale laser kit availability? I'm not as skilled at the technical industries such as huge mills or factory complexes but I do have structures that can help add to a layout. I need to do more market research myself I realize. I'll bet you have more barns and houses than you need. I would always hear the mantra from Z scalers that they wanted anything close to the tracks. I have those. But I also enjoy creating structures that are in the rest of the real world and that means away from the tracks.

I'm all ears, just don't bury me with one of a kind pet projects lest I get scared off and toss the lasers  :facepalm:

Catt

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Re: What Era
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2013, 12:45:52 AM »
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Hi Karin,
  My list includes modern big box stores (or at least the facade)

A modern brick & concrete  or steel factory building flat

  Modern gas stations

  How about a line of store fronts to be used with the DPM kits

  A DQ type icecream shop both the walk up and the restuarant type

There's my quarters worth.
Johnathan (Catt) Edwards
Sole owner of the
Grande Valley Railway
100% Michigan made

daniel_leavitt2000

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Re: What Era
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2013, 12:51:44 AM »
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I am a modern modeler.

Modular moden brick buildings with large windows are very few and far between. I think we need a lot more modern structures and a lot less quaint and eccentric buildings (like Bar Mills, N Scale Architec). There are few brick and stone stations.

Did you know there are virtually no ranch style houses? Everything available seems to be a section or company house. Thats great for the tracks, but it just dosen't fit suburbia.

Other major holes include big box stores, fast food joints, strip malls, modern gas stations and office buildings.
Celebrating 1000 days of humiliation.

Hyperion

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Re: What Era
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2013, 01:11:48 AM »
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Despite rolling stock availability that arguably favors a more modern era, perhaps even moreso than other scales, there is virtually nothing available for the Modern era in N-scale off the track, what with Walthers not bringing any of their good HO scale modern structures over to our side.  If it was built after about 1970, there's unlikely a model of anything like it in N scale.  Closest thing I've seen to 'modern' was Nu-Line's couple of modern poured concrete warehouse kits -- and those can fetch 2-4 times their original price on eBay thesedays.  There is Summit CustomCuts as well, but they've only got a few kits, I think they're all modern fast-food restaurants (so no industries to speak of), and I haven't heard so much as a peep from anyone who's actually gotten one and can speak about it at all; so for all I know they're not even around making kits anymore.

I think one of the problems is that modern structures don't really utilize the usual laser media -- i.e. wood.  Modern structures are mostly poured concrete, steel, and glass; things that etching wood doesn't really do well I don't believe.
-Mark

bill pearce

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Re: What Era
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2013, 01:12:21 AM »
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My previous layout was set in fall 1966, and I see no reason the change the next.

Bill Pearce

delamaize

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Re: What Era
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2013, 01:30:22 AM »
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I'm a transision era modeler. Speficily 1943-1955, and I'm modeling the PNW
Mike

Northern Pacific, Tacoma Division, 4th subdivision "The Prarie Line" (still in planning stages)

nkalanaga

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Re: What Era
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2013, 01:54:31 AM »
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Modern buildings are rare in N scale, so might sell well.

Older buildings are still common in the real world, so would be more widely usable.

Which would sell better I have no idea, as I don't need any buildings...too many in the supply boxes that don't have room on the layout as it is.
N Kalanaga
Be well

Alaska Railroader

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Re: What Era
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2013, 02:39:43 AM »
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I think one of the problems is that modern structures don't really utilize the usual laser media -- i.e. wood.  Modern structures are mostly poured concrete, steel, and glass; things that etching wood doesn't really do well I don't believe.

I must fix this thinking for you.  :D  You might have caught on in this forum that I lasered the 3D parts for David's crawlers, buses, switch machines, and the TBS series he and I did together. What you might be surprised to learn is that none of those were wood. I go through more .030 acrylic than I do wood. Same with the thinner sizes of laserboard.  I just recently finished lasering the sides and upper structures of a replica of the QE2 cruise ship for a master ship model builder. Measuring 5 feet long it is probably somewhere between N and Z scale. No wood used, all acrylic.

Samples of more modern items from Stonebridge https://picasaweb.google.com/114371775303381702075/ModernStructuresByStonebridge#

I enjoy modern. I'm taking notes so keep talking....

ryan_wilkerson

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Re: What Era
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2013, 03:11:37 AM »
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My era is 1990s so modern buildings sound good to me. I also like the trackside structures that are either modern or were commonly around in the 90s.

The Daze Inn and the Shell station are great...what scale are those available?

aquaper

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Re: What Era
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2013, 03:52:24 AM »
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I really like the DQ, the Shell station, and the motel.  I'm also a modern era modeler, so your structures really appeal to me.  Make a Tim Hortons and all the Canadians will go crazy :lol:
Paul

pjm20

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Re: What Era
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2013, 07:19:44 AM »
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The PRR in 1930, Harrisburg PA. Also a freelanced HCD set in Appalachia 1920-1950.
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conrail98

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Re: What Era
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2013, 07:21:08 AM »
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1990s and I too would like to say modern, boxy-type stores and modern homes. I don't know about everyone else doing modern, but a lot of that "space" that used to be towns has become littered with look-alike developments,

Phil
- Phil

NARmike

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Re: What Era
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2013, 07:59:51 AM »
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I'm suprised that more people are not responding for 70's era stuff... there are quite a few disco kids in this crowd  8)

As far as the 70's go, a 1970's KFC would have a lot of appeal to me and many others. Maybe one of those sleezy cinderblock motels too.

Another one missing from what is availabe would be a small appartment building or one of those generic 4-plexes.

But the KFC would definately be a popular one in my opinion.

BTW... thanks for asking.



Mike Maisonneuve
Modeling the Northern Alberta Railway's Peace River subdivision in N scale
http://nscalenar.blogspot.ca/

Philip H

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Re: What Era
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2013, 08:55:19 AM »
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Karin,
Being a modern modeler (1995-2005) I can echo a lot of these comments.  That said, I'm also a southern modeler, and thus alot of the buildings I could use are from the 60's through the 80's, but modernized in some way.  I don't have pics for you, but not everything found in 1997 (FWIW) was built in 1997.  We need a mix of styles to match the real world.

That said, your shell station is nice - but I need either Texaco, Amoco, or Gulf/BP to match.
Philip H.
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Baton Rouge Southern RR - Mount Rainier Division.

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Rossford Yard

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Re: What Era
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2013, 09:35:55 AM »
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Currently modeling 2004, based on availability of Atlas and other Harbor Belt stuff.  Have modeled from 1970 on with various layouts, and seem to keep updating to be about ten years behind the times.

I would second (or fifth?) the modern structures ideas, perhaps modular or at least in flats, so we can model bigger industries that would be typical.  How about combing photos on a styrene backdrop with an actuall flat/partial structure?  Things like Ethanol unloading might be great.  Or modern power plant (both on the delivery rather than mfg side of the equation)

Thanks for asking for input.  Hope it comes out well.