Author Topic: Mill Creek HOn30  (Read 46485 times)

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davefoxx

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Re: Mill Creek HOn30
« Reply #495 on: January 18, 2021, 11:55:03 AM »
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To add to what Dave Vollmer said, I think the small drivers will be less noticeable once the locomotive is painted a darker color than that resin print.  Looks real close to EBT No. 7 to me.  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:East_Broad_Top_Railroad_7.jpg

How did they fire locomotives like this, with such a disparity between the cab floor and the tender deck?  Was the backhead (and hence the clamshell doors) close to the end of the cab floor?  Surely, they didn't have to climb into the cab while shoveling coal.

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k27463

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Re: Mill Creek HOn30
« Reply #496 on: January 18, 2021, 12:23:27 PM »
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How did they fire locomotives like this, with such a disparity between the cab floor and the tender deck?  Was the backhead (and hence the clamshell doors) close to the end of the cab floor?  Surely, they didn't have to climb into the cab while shoveling coal.

DFF

The backhead likely continued to the back of the cab with the fire doors near the lower half to match the deck height of the tender.

I believe all (at the very least, most) of the D&RGW narrow gauge 2-8-0s were built like this as well as countless other locomotives.  I've attached a photo of D&RGW C-16 #278 that I shot this summer.

Dave V

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Re: Mill Creek HOn30
« Reply #497 on: January 18, 2021, 12:36:14 PM »
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The backhead likely continued to the back of the cab with the fire doors near the lower half to match the deck height of the tender.

I believe all (at the very least, most) of the D&RGW narrow gauge 2-8-0s were built like this as well as countless other locomotives.  I've attached a photo of D&RGW C-16 #278 that I shot this summer.

Right.  The C-19 class on the D&RGW/RGS was similar, with the backhead flush with the back wall of the cab.  To keep the fireman warm during Colorado's long winters, they often hung heavy canvas curtains that closed off the space on the footplate between the cab and the tender.
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Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: Mill Creek HOn30
« Reply #498 on: January 18, 2021, 01:32:37 PM »
+1
You can see how it works on 475's cab here:


packers#1

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Re: Mill Creek HOn30
« Reply #499 on: January 18, 2021, 02:11:50 PM »
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Efficient, if cramped, use of footprint
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Chris333

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Re: Mill Creek HOn30
« Reply #500 on: January 18, 2021, 03:20:15 PM »
+1
Sorta like that last photo. The center of the cab floor dropped down to the same level as the tender.

Chris333

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Re: Mill Creek HOn30
« Reply #501 on: January 18, 2021, 05:11:59 PM »
+1
Lowered the body about .040" I like it now. Got the tender trucks painted up.



There was a proposed 2-8-0 for the 2' gauge SR&RL that had a lower boiler so modeling 30" gauge I have to fall somewhere in the middle.