Author Topic: The Transcontinental PRR  (Read 87958 times)

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nscalemike

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2011, 05:33:12 PM »
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I'll also be interested to hear how well those atlas switches and motors operate.  I will need several in my staging yard as well and I like the price and I like the machine is on top.  My staging is completely accessible as its on the top level, so replacing motors won't be a hassle, but I want to know that the turnouts themselves operate smoothly.  I will need to get at least a step stool to reach up there so I don't want to do that every time I run a train!

John

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2011, 05:38:46 PM »
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The shortest tracks at the left are 10'6" long.

I should have figured that the Atlas motors would be cheap.  They were also inexpensive.  Oh well, that's a bridge that we'll cross when we get to it.  The next level will be 7" above this, so I should be able to squeeze a small screwdriver in there.

7" is probably workable .. its only a couple of screws, and a little mirror should make it doable ..  also, make sure you run all your engines through these before you close it up .. I had some problems with plows hitting the motors, .. you might need a little filing

S Class

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2011, 10:16:34 PM »
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quick thought before you drop other stuff on it have you considered using the atlas re-railers on all tracks to catch any derailments in staging? especially on the back tracks it may make life a lot easier down the line.
Regards
Tony A

3DTrains

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2011, 10:40:41 PM »
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The shortest tracks at the left are 10'6" long.

Hi Eric,

Have you consider using a compound ladder instead? This might allow you to squeeze another 6" or so on either end in the same width. Either way, this is bound to be a great layout.

Cheers!
Marc - 3DTrains.com

eric220

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2011, 01:10:08 AM »
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quick thought before you drop other stuff on it have you considered using the atlas re-railers on all tracks to catch any derailments in staging? especially on the back tracks it may make life a lot easier down the line.

Yes, I did give thought to that. I decided instead to put double rerailers before each throat to try and catch anything coming into the yard before it hits the ladders.
-Eric

Modeling a transcontinental PRR
http://www.pennsylvania-railroad.com

eric220

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2011, 01:16:27 AM »
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Hi Eric,

Have you consider using a compound ladder instead? This might allow you to squeeze another 6" or so on either end in the same width. Either way, this is bound to be a great layout.

Cheers!
Marc - 3DTrains.com

That one boils down to one of the design criteria for the layout. I planned it for 10' trains. I've got more space along that wall, so if I wanted more length, I could just extend the yard tracks, probably up to 18" or two feet. Trains longer than 10' would be a rarity, so that's how big the yard is.
-Eric

Modeling a transcontinental PRR
http://www.pennsylvania-railroad.com

reinhardtjh

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2011, 05:18:54 AM »
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Eric .. make sure that you have access to the switch machines .. those things are notorious for burning out ...

Any idea if using a CD (capacitive discharge) unit to drive them helps avoid the burnout?
John H. Reinhardt
PRRT&HS #8909
C&O HS #11530
N-Trak #7566

wm3798

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2011, 06:55:37 PM »
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Yes, I did give thought to that. I decided instead to put double rerailers before each throat to try and catch anything coming into the yard before it hits the ladders.

The problem usually isn't something derailing on the way in...  It's usually the train that's been in storage that gets bumped off the rails when you're not there...  someone running a vacuum, a dog chasing a moth, you bumping into it after your 11th Amber Lager...  Then, when it's time to head back into service, the errant car is dragging toward the turnout, the coupler pin catches on the wrong side of the frog, then the bolster pin falls out, and the first 15 cars in the train stringline all over the ground...

Ask me how I know... :P

Lee
Route of the Alpha Jets

Lee Weldon www.wmrywesternlines.net

eric220

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2011, 05:33:02 AM »
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Well, I just put down the last of the return loop.  Here's a little taste of what this layout will handle.







Can't really see it here, but those are Laurel Valley hoppers at the head of the coal consist.

This was a bit of a surprise for me.  What you see here represents the vast majority of my rolling stock.
-Eric

Modeling a transcontinental PRR
http://www.pennsylvania-railroad.com

wm3798

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2011, 06:49:08 PM »
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Did you subcontract the track work to CSX?  Those kinks may seem harmless now, but wait until you cover up the staging yard... :P

Don't ask me how I know this... ::)
Route of the Alpha Jets

Lee Weldon www.wmrywesternlines.net

seusscaboose

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2011, 06:54:55 PM »
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"I have a train full of basements"

NKPH&TS #3589


Inspiration at:
http://nkphts.org/modelersnotebook

eric220

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2011, 07:13:16 PM »
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sweet nkp car hidden in there
 ;)

NKP car?  Are you referring to this guy?

-Eric

Modeling a transcontinental PRR
http://www.pennsylvania-railroad.com

seusscaboose

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2011, 07:17:41 PM »
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ahhh yes...

well...
close enough...

i will accept Tony's version....

I often wondered what Milepost 1 would look like in NKP font...

EP
"I have a train full of basements"

NKPH&TS #3589


Inspiration at:
http://nkphts.org/modelersnotebook

eric220

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2011, 10:14:04 PM »
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Did you subcontract the track work to CSX?  Those kinks may seem harmless now, but wait until you cover up the staging yard... :P

Don't ask me how I know this... ::)

There's pretty heavy zoom distortion in that photo.  Those "kinks" are 6" or more long.  So far, I haven't had any trouble, but I do intend to wire everything up and run trains over all of this before covering it up.
-Eric

Modeling a transcontinental PRR
http://www.pennsylvania-railroad.com

eric220

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Re: The Transcontinental PRR
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2011, 01:48:54 AM »
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Staging is just about complete.  As I mentioned before, I got the return loop laid.



The only thing that's left is the spur to "Five Fingers Maintenance" and the helix (or nolix) up.  I've been testing the return loop with the various trains that I assembled in staging (using the 0-5-0), and I must say, I was reminded why I love Kato so much.  No coupling issues, no derailment issues, nary a hiccup.  There were a few derailments with some of the other sets, but most were attributable to human error.  The rest were attributable to one turnout in the throat that was having an issue with its switch machine.  That has been fixed.  So far, so good!
« Last Edit: June 14, 2011, 01:51:32 AM by eric220 »
-Eric

Modeling a transcontinental PRR
http://www.pennsylvania-railroad.com