Author Topic: IATR 13146  (Read 2378 times)

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elogger

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IATR 13146
« on: June 16, 2009, 11:31:48 PM »
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hey guys, it's been a while since i've posted here... life's twists and turns took me away from trains for quite a while but i finally got back into things a few weeks ago and finally finished a project i originally started in 2007...

comments or questions are always welcome


jeremy









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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2009, 01:38:03 AM »
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Nice!!!!  Could you summarize your techniques?

Biased turkey

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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2009, 01:41:31 AM »
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Jeremy, great work, well done. Thank for posting those pictures.
Could you please tell me what does IATR means ?
I'm particularly impressed with the rust. Are you using artist oils ?.
Could you please elaborate about your technique because I'm interested in CN  ( and GTW ) and my 1st attempt at using artist oil  paint for rust didn't exactly turns the way I was expecting: the paint is too thick ( particularly in N scale ).
Here is the result:



Jacques

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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2009, 07:58:33 AM »
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Wow, Jeremy, you knocked my socks off with that, and now I still can't find one of 'em... :)

I'd like to reiterate the request to describe your techniques.  The roof, rust pits and streaks are particularly well done.

Is this your prototype?   I think you really nailed it:



Ed N.

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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2009, 08:27:58 AM »
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Wow, that does look good!

up1950s

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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2009, 08:41:15 AM »
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Mind blowing , museum quality , wow . What scale is that ?
« Last Edit: June 17, 2009, 08:42:59 AM by up1950s »

elogger

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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2009, 09:53:08 AM »
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thanks guys, IATR is iowa traction co... the car is HO scale... and ed i would have killed for that pic when i was doing this car! i looked all over for something with a nasty roof on an evans car and couldn't find anything, let alone one on a gt car... the two cars i used for this project were numbers 13146 and 13150... im pretty sure both are on rrpicturearchives.com... i basically used 13146 for the smiley face side and 13150 for the other side... when i was finished i noticed some small differences between the two and had to go back and add a little something to each side to make the car look right...

as far as my techniques, i basically started out with a fade of white tinted with a little blue and shot it through the airbrush... the rust is more or less layers of two or three different colors... raw sienna, burnt sienna and raw umber... i personally use artist oils exclusively thinned out with mineral spirits... basically dab some paint on the car and then come back with a clean wet brush and drop the spirits on the car around that spot of paint... the paint will sort of spread out and now you want your brush to be dry and you can basically put the brush into your puddle and it will wick up the excess fluid and paint... you can do this to control the size and consistency of your spots... in ho scale i try to make everyhitng as flat as possible... i know some people are fans of texture in weathering but you have to think in terms of scale... i would think that something you can feel with your fingers would probably be ridiculously thick in real life... in N scale it would have to be even more so... so i guess the trick is to make your rust look 3-d but keep it 2-d... that being said you want to make sure that little dab of paint you put on the side of the car is flat... after it's dried a bit you want to come back with your second color, a darker color because that's how we want to work, light to dark... then you simply repeat what you did for the first color... dab, wet, kinda work the paint a bit then clean off the excess... then on to the third color... the large spots that look black on the side of the car are raw sienna, burnt sienna and raw umber in that order...

as  far as the streaks, i would decide where i wanted them and then more or less paint a stripe down the side of the car... sometimes all the way down but sometimes i would try to keep it short... you want to be careful because the oil paint has a tendency to 'stain', meaning it will leave some of the color behind regardless of how often you go back over it with your spirits and try to take it off... ribs are your friends here... they definitely help in keeping things straight... then with a wet brush you can go back and it's almost as if you are whittling the stripe away... most of my streaks are done with burnt sienna with a little raw umber at the top... same thing only on a smaller scale for streaks coming out of a spot or pit...

on the roof i used the same principles, light to dark and it was basically all about controlling the puddles...

i hope this is somewhat helpful to you all... im not the best at explaining what i did exactly... hopefully that makes some sense... lol


jeremy

Biased turkey

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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2009, 10:55:09 PM »
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Thank you Jeremy for taking some of your valuable time to reply and to elaborate on your technique.
I agree 100% that paint should be as flat as possible, the problem is  worse in N scale.On my GTW boxcar I even had to use a fine grade sanding paper in order to reduce the paint thickness.
 I switched to acrylic paint, it is thinner but it doesn't spread as good as oil paint.
After seeing the great results you get with oil painting, I'm ready to give it a 2nd chance.

About the rusting sequence ( light to dark ) , I always thought that one should apply the old rust ( the dark ) then the recent one ( light ) , but obviously, your result proves me that I'm wrong.

Do you wait several days , for the oil paint to dry, before applying the next layer ?

Jacques

elogger

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Re: IATR 13146
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2009, 08:18:19 PM »
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no jacques, i usually will go through and do one color one night then come back the next and do the other color the next night... that's just how i work though... im sure if you gave the paint a little time it'll set up enough to layer over top of it...


jeremy