Author Topic: Sample weathered decking  (Read 3132 times)

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railbuilderdave

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Sample weathered decking
« on: October 25, 2008, 05:30:50 PM »
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I've weathered some decking for a pier I'm building and I would like to know what you think of my weathering of the wood.  I've mix all my own colors and I've used a/i wash.  This sample deck is a small area on the Campbell pier kit and I'm almost all the way done with the weathering of the deck but this is the only section I've completely finished.

Dave




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clarkrw3

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2008, 06:47:20 PM »
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I think it looks great!!

3rdrail

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2008, 07:01:52 PM »
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It looks very good, but it is hard to tell out of context. What is it supposed to represent, treated wood laid flat? Are the brownish red parts supposed to represent rust stains? Finally is it treated or untreated wood?

Iain

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2008, 07:03:16 PM »
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Too much brown.  If it is treated, you need a little green here and there.
Thanks much,
Mairi Dulaney, RHCE
Member, Free Software Foundation and Norfolk Southern Historical Society

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3rdrail

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2008, 07:26:10 PM »
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Too much brown.  If it is treated, you need a little green here and there.

Where do you get the green for creosote treated wood?? The newer CCA treated wood is greenish, but that was only used for a couple of decades and fades out quickly. Creosote treated wood has been used for over a century.

Iain

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2008, 08:26:28 PM »
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Too much brown.  If it is treated, you need a little green here and there.

Where do you get the green for creosote treated wood?? The newer CCA treated wood is greenish, but that was only used for a couple of decades and fades out quickly. Creosote treated wood has been used for over a century.
You're right, wasn't thinking about era.
still, need less brown, only a small hint drybrushed on is all that is needed.  I'll get some photos of the docks in Beaufort this week.
Thanks much,
Mairi Dulaney, RHCE
Member, Free Software Foundation and Norfolk Southern Historical Society

http://jdulaney.com

DKS

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2008, 09:56:55 PM »
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It's hard to tell as the white balance in the image looks off. Assuming the paper is a neutral color, this should be closer to reality:



IMO, I think the variations are just a little bit too strong; I think the boards would tend to be closer in hue and lightness. The area in the right half between the two dark streaks looks best. I also think there would be evidence of wear.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2008, 10:04:34 PM by David K. Smith »
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railbuilderdave

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2008, 02:00:58 AM »
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David,
What evidence of wear would you say is needed?  I was going to add some ruts where vehicles are run over the wood but I wasn't thinking much about the areas where only people walk.
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DKS

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2008, 05:19:57 AM »
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David,
What evidence of wear would you say is needed?  I was going to add some ruts where vehicles are run over the wood but I wasn't thinking much about the areas where only people walk.

Usually, where the wood is worn more, it goes lighter, and variations in color decrease; it acquires a kind of "sameness". This is not the best example, but it's what I could find in a hurry.

http://www.treklens.com/workshops/2912/photo13803.htm
« Last Edit: October 26, 2008, 05:31:26 AM by David K. Smith »
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Iain

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2008, 08:42:52 AM »
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I'll go get you a bunch of photos tomorrow morning of the planking on docks. 
Thanks much,
Mairi Dulaney, RHCE
Member, Free Software Foundation and Norfolk Southern Historical Society

http://jdulaney.com

up1950s

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« Last Edit: October 28, 2008, 07:48:02 PM by up1950s »

wm3798

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2008, 04:13:03 PM »
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I like it.  It will be a lot easier to judge the effect when it is in the context of the surrounding scenery.  Looking at it under harsh photo lighting against a white background isn't going to tell me much.

The darker streaks could represent wood that was recently replaced. 

One thing to think about, would be board length.  How wide is your pier?  If it's wider than 12' or 16', it's likely there would be two boards making up the length of each plank.  20' and longer wouldn't be out of the question, but since those lengths would be a lot more expensive per board foot, it would be cheaper to build the surface by using say, a 12' and an 8' plank with the joints staggered.

Lee
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railbuilderdave

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2008, 07:28:52 PM »
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I like it.  It will be a lot easier to judge the effect when it is in the context of the surrounding scenery.  Looking at it under harsh photo lighting against a white background isn't going to tell me much.

The darker streaks could represent wood that was recently replaced. 

One thing to think about, would be board length.  How wide is your pier?  If it's wider than 12' or 16', it's likely there would be two boards making up the length of each plank.  20' and longer wouldn't be out of the question, but since those lengths would be a lot more expensive per board foot, it would be cheaper to build the surface by using say, a 12' and an 8' plank with the joints staggered.

Lee

Lee,
Thanks for the lengths of boards because I was thinking I would need to add breaks on the width of the decking but I want to wait till I have the support cross beams in place so I know where I can place the joints.  I know I have a few and hope the will work out ok now but I'm going to have to deal with those for now.
Dave
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railbuilderdave

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2008, 11:42:29 PM »
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Here is an update to the dock project I'm working that the earlier posting was a sample of:







I still have much more to build and I really need to think about where I want to put this when it's done.  This model is built from the Campbell kit but I built this one from scratch and still have the kit to do again later.  I wanted to try my hand on my own wood before I did the kit to learn about how to work with wood.

Thanks for looking and any comments
Dave
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wazzou

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Re: Sample weathered decking
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2008, 12:14:14 AM »
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Dave -
I think that looks really good.  I think the piling would be quite a bit darker still if it were pressure treated with something like Creosote.  Even older Creo treated piling still has a lot of treatment in it particularly if in salt water.
It sure was good of Iain to come through with those photos for you.
Bryan

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