Author Topic: Homasote  (Read 1565 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Mark5

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 9424
  • Always with the negative waves Moriarty ...
  • Respect: +231
Homasote
« on: December 09, 2007, 11:42:22 AM »
0
I can't understand why anyone has problems with Homasote.

Perhaps it is the way they install it?

I use a simple method: 1/2" homasote glued to 1/2" plywood with white glue (I clamp it while drying)

I've never had or witnessed any problems in over 3 decades (the HO club I belonged to in the 70s is where I first saw it).

What gives? ???
« Last Edit: December 09, 2007, 11:46:10 AM by NandW »

Zox

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 1120
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +2
    • Lord Zox's Home Page
Re: Homasote
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2007, 01:24:00 PM »
0
I can think of two things:

1. It swells in thickness when it gets wet, and never quite goes back to its original shape or density. This precludes using "water-soluble scenery" techniques unless the Homasote is sealed first.

2. It seems solid enough to be self-supporting as roadbed, but isn't, quite. If you just use Homasote, the roadbed will sag. So if you have to use plywood anyway, why bother with the Homasote?
Rob M., a.k.a. Zox
z o x @ v e r i z o n . n e t
http://lordzox.com/
It is said a Shaolin chef can wok through walls...

Mark5

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 9424
  • Always with the negative waves Moriarty ...
  • Respect: +231
Re: Homasote
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2007, 02:52:57 PM »
0
Reason for homasote? The sound of a layout is much quieter than anything slapped on plywood.

Homasote is definately not strong enough to use solely as roadbed. Thats why the traditional method is to glue it to plywood. Using Homasote alone is FOLLY.

As I stated, I have used this on several layouts with NO problems at all. I've yet to personally witness any problems.

Now granted -  I don't pour water on my layouts ...

« Last Edit: December 09, 2007, 03:10:53 PM by NandW »

cuyama

  • Guest
Re: Homasote
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2007, 06:02:08 PM »
0
Though Homasote often takes the rap, I think it's usually the wood moving underneath. If Homasote's own site is to be believed, they left some of it outside for a couple of years in New Jersey and it didn't change length or width appreciably.
http://www.homasote.com/strength/index.html

inkaneer

  • Guest
Re: Homasote
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2007, 08:35:47 PM »
0
Homasote is heavy which precludes its use on modules.  As I get older I appreciate more and more the weight saving ideas that come along.  Cork roadbed on 1/4" plywood with proper bracing underneath is quit sufficient.

asciibaron

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 3101
  • Respect: 0
    • Steve's Happy Fun Time IntarWebs
Re: Homasote
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2007, 11:46:51 AM »
0
i use Homasote - it's easy to work with and deadens sound.  it's a great roadbed for yards and industrial trackage.  i put cork roadbed on top to form the mains.  i've never had a problem using water based scenery techniques nor have i have trackwork issues due to humidity.  i like the product and prefer it to foam insulation products for permanent or semi-permanent layouts.  for modules i think a plywood/foam sandwich is the way to go.

-steve
Quote from: Chris333
How long will it be before they show us how to add DCC to a tree?