Author Topic: Relaying Ties in NZ  (Read 1134 times)

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womblenz

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Relaying Ties in NZ
« on: November 16, 2007, 01:05:31 AM »
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Coming home from work one day I came across this.



I spoke to the Foreman on the job and asked to take some closer photos to which he said yes
so here we go



Just what to call that Loco I'm not to sure  ???








I'll split this a little

Cheers Warren

womblenz

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Re: Relaying Ties in NZ
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2007, 01:10:36 AM »
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Back again  LOL

This next machine really took my eye







This whole thing would make a real cool diarama I would like to try one day.

Cheers Warren

Mark4

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Re: Relaying Ties in NZ
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2007, 03:48:37 AM »
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Good pictures - where were they taken?

This rig has been around for some years - I photographed it in Kaikoura in the early 90s.

womblenz

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Re: Relaying Ties in NZ
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2007, 04:59:36 AM »
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Hi Mark

I took them just out of Woodville about 30kms east of Palmerston North.

I have never seen it before but it was interesting to watch.

Cheers Warren

cv_acr

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Re: Relaying Ties in NZ
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2007, 12:51:13 AM »
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Back again  LOL

This next machine really took my eye



WTF?

An arch-bar truck?

Cool rig btw, nice catch. That must have been neat to watch.

Mark4

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Re: Relaying Ties in NZ
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2007, 06:29:20 PM »
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WTF?

An arch-bar truck?


With roller bearing inserts!
Curiouser and curiouser, said Alice

You will find some other oddities here as well (although i have not seen archbar trucks on anything else). A lot of the older (70s vintage) freight cars have a type of truss-rod construction (although its steel angle rather than rod).