Author Topic: layout planning, how do you do it?  (Read 5377 times)

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ednadolski

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Re: layout planning, how do you do it?
« Reply #30 on: November 07, 2007, 07:42:44 PM »
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If your train length is limited by your passing sidings to a representative 20 cars, then you don't need a yard designed for trains of 100 cars.

That's exactly what I ran into with Tehachapi: a full scale-sized layout also would need 100+ car trains.   But the thought of trying to get that to work reliably with +2% grades and truck-mounted couplers was rather daunting.   (There is the cost factor too -- at $20+ per car, those prototype length trains can add up!)  :)

But the other thing I noticed is that even if you build an exact scale replica,  your eyes still don't see the model/replica in the same way that you would see the prototype of you were there.  That may seem obvious but to me it wasn't apparent until I built a mockup.   It just reinforces the point that models will always necessarily be representational as you say.

DKS

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Re: layout planning, how do you do it?
« Reply #31 on: November 07, 2007, 08:57:41 PM »
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...your eyes still don't see the model/replica in the same way that you would see the prototype of you were there...

That's the problem with having eyes spaced 40 feet apart.
“Everyone leaves unfinished business. That's what dying is.” —Amos, The Expanse

pbrooks

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Re: layout planning, how do you do it?
« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2007, 08:10:03 PM »
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Wow!

That's a TON of good advice all in one post.
Way to go, Lee!  ;D

Lee's experience was bought by actually constructing a layout... no pie-in-the sky theory, but practical experience.

That's the problem with some of the advice you get from a few of the Layout Design Sig types. Their expertise is all from books.
(Just a few, mind you, most of those folks are REALLY helpful)

Still, I always trust folks with soldering iron scars and plaster under their nails!

Tom, print out Lee's post and read it right before planning your layout... it's worth its weight in gold!

Later,

-Phil

I think it's easy to get wrapped around the axle with prototype dimensions.  In reality, the model railroader needs a yard that accommodates the needs of the layout, not the prototype.  If your train length is limited by your passing sidings to a representative 20 cars, then you don't need a yard designed for trains of 100 cars.
If you have a fleet of 20 locomotives, you don't need a terminal that can handle 60.
If you have room for 6 industries that can only take two cars at a time, then you don't need to be able to switch 50...  etc. etc. etc.

Model railroads are representational only insofar as they are presentational.  It all goes back to the idea of building a theater set.  As long as the operator and/or visitor sees what appears to be a functional railroad, then for all intents and purposes, it is!

For the rest of the layout, my goal is to create vignettes that show the railroad at work, with enough connective tissue to bring them all together into a coherent design.  While it may appear desirable to model a particular segment inch for inch, the practical reality is that (with rare exception) you can't.  It can also be argued that you shouldn't.

The objective of a good layout design should be to attract and hold the operator's interest.  This objective is going to be met in different ways by different modelers, but it is almost always going to involve a fair amount of compression.  The trick is to arrive at a ratio that satisfies your need to recognize the prototypical scene, functions the way you want it to, and yet still fit within the physical constraints of your train room.  It is a game of balance and compromise.

Lee
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wm3798

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Re: layout planning, how do you do it?
« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2007, 08:37:30 PM »
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Boy, at $895 an oz, if I was worth my weight in gold, I'd be a BILLIONAIRE!!

(Thanks for the not, Phil... you're no slouch yourself...)

Lee
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Ian MacMillan

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Re: layout planning, how do you do it?
« Reply #34 on: November 09, 2007, 01:38:19 PM »
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...and have you looked into this resource... http://www.westcoastrailforums.com/view_forum.php?id=107

I'm more interested in the photo of the Fairmont A5-C still in RR service in 2005 in the GG20 thread! 1st photo of the thread.
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sirenwerks

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Re: layout planning, how do you do it?
« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2007, 03:08:20 PM »
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Quote
...and have you looked into this resource... http://www.westcoastrailforums.com/view_forum.php?id=107

I'm more interested in the photo of the Fairmont A5-C still in RR service in 2005 in the GG20 thread! 1st photo of the thread.

Actually, I was just trying to point Tom to the LAJ list itself as a resource, not any of the specifics in the link. It's always nice to have someone who can answer questions, esp. since there are apparently a number of LAJ employees on the list or folks who have access to them.
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