Author Topic: Noob question about signals  (Read 1962 times)

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Caleb Austin

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Noob question about signals
« on: April 27, 2007, 04:44:46 PM »
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Is it OK to put signals on a single track and only a single track? I really like the way signals look and want too add some to my layout but dont
want to change the flowing single track mainline. So can I add a pair of signals on my single track main without adding double tracks?

Iain

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2007, 04:50:53 PM »
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Sure thing.  Not at all uncommon; indeed VERY common.
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Ian MacMillan

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2007, 05:46:09 PM »
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Signals on single track is almost as common as the sun.

They can be used to driect flow for blocks, and can also be placed before interlockings ect.
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3rdrail

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2007, 05:55:08 PM »
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Signals are even more important on single track than multiple track. Since trains often cannot stop within sight distance, they prevent head-on collisions, aka "cornfield meets". So your single track should have signals pointing in both directions. Even unsignaled lines (dark territory) will have signals at junctions with, or crossings of, other railroad lines.

Caleb Austin

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2007, 06:02:03 PM »
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Exellent :D thanks guys.

keystonecrossings

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2007, 10:45:54 AM »
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NOTE: With most railroads, "intermediate" signals, as we are discussing, are single head signals. They also usually have a number plate indicating mile post for the line.

Interlocking signals are usually dual (or more) head and do not have a number plate.

The signals directly protecting the interlocking are call "home" signals. One signal out from them are also interlocking signals and they are called "distant" signals. The "distant" signals provide advance warning of the aspect that the "home" signal is displaying so that trains can react accordingly.
Jerry Britton, PRRT&HS #6111
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Robbman

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2007, 10:43:41 PM »
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Message deleted
« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 02:05:44 AM by Robbman »

TrainCat2

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Re: Noob question about signals - Shameless Plug
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2007, 11:59:07 PM »
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Regards
Bob Knight

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Dupesy

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2007, 03:03:34 PM »
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By FRA rule, all control points have to have names, all intermediates are to be numbered by milepost, with the exception of restricting signals (an intermediate with no mile marker displaying a stop indication may be passed at restricting speed without having to get DS permission)

True to a point.  All control points must be identified as such (CP-whatever) but doesn't have to be a name.  The mileage will work.  For instance, one location on my railroad (the real one I work for) is known as Rockingham, CPF-256.  (the F indicates it's a control point on the Freight Main Line) The dispatcher can give us instructions using either title.  Two miles away to the west at the other end of the controlled siding, is CPF-258.  No name, just the mileage.  The signal prior to CPF-256, (to the east) if you were heading towards it, (westward movement) is a Distant Signal mileage 253.4.  It is identified as a Distant Signal as it has two, offset targets and a numberboard.  On the other side of the mast, for movements heading away (eastward) from CPF-256, is an Automatic Signal, mileage 253.41, and is identified as such with a single target with a numberboard.  (no signal may have the same number, even if on the same mast)  Neither NORAC nor GCOR operating rules allow for passing a Stop Signal that does not display a numberboard.  In fact, my Rules Examiner took it so far as to say that if you come upon an Automatic Signal that displays Stop and the numberboard has fallen off, you  must stop and contact the Dispatcher.  Per operating rules, a signal displaying Stop with a numberboard is actually a signal displaying Stop And Proceed, meaning a train must stop, then proceed at Restricted Speed until a more favorable signal is encountered, etc.  There are exceptions to this (other markings on the signal in addition to the numberboard) that I won't bore you with.  Additionally a railroad's Special Instructions may alter some of these rules.  For instance, my railroad's Special Instructions state that a freight train encountering a Stop And Proceed indication my proceed at Restricted Speed without stopping.

That concludes the Rules Refresher for the day.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 03:05:29 PM by Dupesy »
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Robbman

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2007, 06:43:46 PM »
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Message deleted
« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 02:05:56 AM by Robbman »

Dupesy

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2007, 06:48:31 PM »
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CP-256 is the name... as is 510, 672, etc.  I didn't say they had to be nouns  :P

Yup yup, I was just clarifying a little.
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Nato

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2007, 02:00:04 PM »
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  A Single Track main line with passing sidings will usually be signaled for traffic in both directions many railroads had signal masts with the signal light head facing in one direction only, now many modern signal applications have double headed signals with the light lenses placed back to back facing in both directions of travel. Two sets of heads on the same mast often have the top head for the main line and the lower one for the siding. Nate Goodman (Nato). Salt Lake, Utah.

One of One-Sixty

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Re: Noob question about signals
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2007, 09:29:03 PM »
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You guys forgot the #1 rule that even beats out the FRA rules and procedures.

Its your layout you can do whatever you want . So if you want to be a and do things differently, go ahead its your layout and your your own critic.

But if you want to be prototypically or really close to it the guys above have said it all.
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