Author Topic: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?  (Read 3681 times)

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3rdrail

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How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« on: March 14, 2007, 02:04:17 PM »
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OK, since there seems to be at least a modicum of interest in this sort of topic, let's start with reefers and see what kind of response we get. The topic will stay open and stickied until no further responses are received for ten days. At that time it will be unstickied and a new topic started. So, let's see some weathered reefers!

Here are some of mine. Keep in mind that I weather cars for their appearance in a train, and not for magnification photography.
 
FGEX 35291

Here is a stock Atlas wood reefer weathered with chalks bought from Micro-Mark. Often wooden cars had individual boards replaced where rot had set in or the wood was splintered in a minor accident. This was quite common, but rarely seen on models.

GARE 68078

Another stock Atlas (in more ways than one  ;D) wood reefer, also weathered with Micro-Mark chalks. In addition to board replacement, the weight data has been updated, another feature often seen on the real thing and seldom modeled.

WFEX 68164

This is an InterMountain kit. Real reefers got mighty grungy, especially in the steam era, as they spent a lot more time in trains moving than the typical boxcar or hopper. Rather than repaint the whole car, the reporting marks and weight data were often repainted if they became too obscured, as was done on this car. This one was done with A.I.M. powders.

OK, I've showed you mine, now y'all show me yours!  ;D ;D :o
« Last Edit: March 15, 2007, 10:00:34 AM by 3rdrail »

hegstad1

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2007, 04:31:55 PM »
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Nice reefers 3rdrail!

This Intermoutain reefer was weathered using acrylic washes and dry brushing.  I may have used a little chalk here and there, especially on the trucks. 

Andrew

Andrew Hegstad

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2007, 04:46:18 PM »
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I love the stray bits of paper on the tack board!  Cool!!

Lee
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Lee Weldon www.wmrywesternlines.net

Diesel

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2007, 06:12:15 PM »
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Here is a car that I'm working on , A Branchline Wood Reefer AKA Burning Reefer !
This project is being done for a Gentelman in England a request to modify a existing
kit with lights and a smoke unit.
Starting with the body [sides] are seperate from it. I took some sand paper and roughed
up the wood running board then a few lite washes. The sides where done starting with
a shot of Dullcote then some A.I.M Weathering powders to tone down the Grey paint.
Using Mineral Spirits I mixed the powder that was on the car and let the mix run into the
grooves when the mix dried I shot it again with Dullcote, next was the same technique
with a dark earth powder.
As a additional project buster the doors where cut out and reinstalled with tape some they
could be opened or closed. For the next bit of fun adding the hardware, grabs and ladders
coupler lift bar and stirrups. These where then weathered with a mix of Floquil Flat and
powder this is a neat technique that will yeild a fine ''rusty'' look. ;D


Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2007, 08:54:00 PM »
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Heh heh heh, smoke reefer... heh heh heh.

tom mann

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2007, 09:39:35 PM »
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Does anyone have suggestions on how to create a peeling paint effect?  The kind of look where the paint has flaked off, revealing old gray wood underneath.

3rdrail

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2007, 10:14:20 PM »
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Does anyone have suggestions on how to create a peeling paint effect?  The kind of look where the paint has flaked off, revealing old gray wood underneath.

I've used a drybrush application of a mixture of Floquil Mud and Reefer Gray. No good photos, though, and it's supposed to rain here tomorrow.

hegstad1

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2007, 11:00:40 PM »
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Does anyone have suggestions on how to create a peeling paint effect?  The kind of look where the paint has flaked off, revealing old gray wood underneath.

I've used a drybrush application of a mixture of Floquil Mud and Reefer Gray. No good photos, though, and it's supposed to rain here tomorrow.

I've essentially done the same thing.  On the boxcar below (mostly the door) I drybrushed on acrylic gray paint and then took an Xacto and lightly scraped some of it away. I also used the same technique on the latest caboose I did.

Andrew


Andrew Hegstad

ryourstone

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2007, 11:47:36 AM »
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Does anyone have suggestions on how to create a peeling paint effect?  The kind of look where the paint has flaked off, revealing old gray wood underneath.

I'm not sure how it would look for wood, but the water/salt crystal technique works pretty good for chipped/peeling paint on metal:

http://www.ryourstone.com/pc/prr_x54_roof_close.jpg

-Rich

ryourstone

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2007, 11:53:58 AM »
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Here's one, weathered with airbrushed underbody and fade coat, then acrylic washes:



-Rich

tom mann

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2007, 04:20:35 PM »
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Does anyone have suggestions on how to create a peeling paint effect?  The kind of look where the paint has flaked off, revealing old gray wood underneath.

I'm not sure how it would look for wood, but the water/salt crystal technique works pretty good for chipped/peeling paint on metal:

http://www.ryourstone.com/pc/prr_x54_roof_close.jpg

-Rich

Hey, I forgot about that.  I'll give that a shot.

Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2007, 11:37:40 PM »
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Ok, I finally remembered!

These two uglies are straight up Athearn mech reefers weathered up quickly with vodka washes of craft paints.

I used much more red on one to represent a car that's slightly older and spent more time in the desert recently (this would be an inbound car on the layout), and the other has gotten some good winter rain on it, washing off the dust, but leaving the dirt.




Iain

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2007, 12:44:48 AM »
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I may actually have something coming IF decals can be done.  Therefore, please keep this thread a little longer.

I never thought I would have something for it, though.  I just found out today that a car I have been planning on doing for some time actually would fit into the reefer catagory.
Thanks much,
Mairi Dulaney, RHCE
Member, Free Software Foundation and Norfolk Southern Historical Society

http://jdulaney.com

3rdrail

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2007, 09:00:05 PM »
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I may actually have something coming IF decals can be done.  Therefore, please keep this thread a little longer.

I never thought I would have something for it, though.  I just found out today that a car I have been planning on doing for some time actually would fit into the reefer catagory.

Iain, if you don't post something by noon tomorrow, 4/1, I will eliminate the "sticky" on this topic. And start another one Monday. 8)

Iain

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Re: How do YOU weather a refrigerator car?
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2007, 12:02:11 AM »
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No decals yet, but here is an end shot:


Although technically a boxcar, during the fishing season these cars carried iced-down fish.  If ever we needed a smell decoder for a car, this is it!

Once I get the tackboards and a few other odds and ends back on, and once I get the decals, this will be NS No. 180.

Here's a question:  where do the steam and electrical lines go?  This IS a piece of head-end equipment, but I don't have a good end shot.

I am going to model the green mold common to old wood of this area by drybrushing lime green onto the lower areas, maybe make a wash out of it for the cracks.  It will get plenty of rust on the metal, as it did spend some time near the ocean.
Thanks much,
Mairi Dulaney, RHCE
Member, Free Software Foundation and Norfolk Southern Historical Society

http://jdulaney.com